Category: Board Capacity Building

The Captain of Your Strategic Governing Team

The following article is excerpted from Doug Eadie and Dave Stackrow’s forthcoming book, Becoming Your Board’s Chief Governing Partner:  a Practical Guidebook for Transit CEOs and CEO-aspirants. When a public transit board  chooses its CEO, it’s also choosing the de facto captain of the Strategic Governing Team.  Governing really is a collaborative venture, involving intensive, well-orchestrated

Thoughts on True Humility and Senator John McCain

Thinking about Senator John McCain this morning – along with millions of my fellow Americans and admirers around the world – reminded me of the critical role that character plays in leadership. Whether one agreed with Senator McCain on one issue or another, I’m sure the overwhelming majority of Americans considered the Senator from Arizona

Get Your Board-CEO Retreat Right

Retreats have become a popular vehicle for involving nonprofit board members, their CEOs, and executives in accomplishing high-impact governing work that could not be accomplished – at least not as well – in regular board business meetings.  Updating a vision statement and identifying and discussing strategic and operational issues certainly fall in this category.  The

CEO Dave Genova on Getting Stakeholder Engagement Right at RTD-Denver

You’ll recall that in earlier posts at this blog we’ve defined “stakeholders” as individuals, groups, and organizations it makes sense to build and maintain relationships with because something important is at stake, for example, political and financial support, credibility, image, etc.  Over my 30 years of work with nonprofit and public CEOs and their boards

CEO Suzanne McCormick on Getting the CEO-COO Partnership Right at United Way Suncoast

Experience has taught me that no matter how well-designed, the chief executive officer-chief operating officer leadership structure can easily fail.  In fact, over my 30 years in the nonprofit leadership business I’ve seen many more CEO-COO duos crash and burn than succeed.  I’m reminded of one of my earliest experiences, when I was chief of